It’s Official: Google Fiber is Coming to San Antonio

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Left to Right, Mark Strama, Mayor Ivy Taylor, and Lorenzo Gomez pose for a photo after the announcement of Google Fiber coming to San Antonio. Photo by Joan Vinson.

City and Google Fiber representatives gathered at Geekdom’s event center Wednesday morning to announce that San Antonio will be added to the list of Google Fiber cities in the U.S.

Think back to when dialup was the norm. The Internet was slow and people couldn’t stream videos online. Then, when broadband surfaced, the Internet sped up and YouTube became a phenomenon. Now with gigabit speeds of up to 1,000 megabits per second – the kind that Google Fiber and AT&T’s Gigapower provides – it’s hard to imagine what the future holds.

San Antonio has worked with Google for more than a year to bring the high-speed Internet to our city.

Mayor Ivy Taylor, who announced Wednesday that Google Fiber will soon begin implementing more than 4,000 miles of fiber-optic network cable to customers across San Antonio, said this project will strengthen the city’s economy.

Mayor Ivy Taylor announces that Google Fiber is coming to San Antonio. Photo by Joan Vinson.

Mayor Ivy Taylor announces that Google Fiber is coming to San Antonio. Photo by Joan Vinson.

“It will help create jobs, it could convince established companies to dig up their roots elsewhere and move to San Antonio and be a springboard for startups, and local innovation, education and technology,” Taylor said.

She said Google’s entrance into the San Antonio market is one of the largest infrastructure investments a private company has made locally in years.

“I’m excited that this could mean amazing things for increasing access to affordable Internet service throughout our community,” she said.

Mark Strama, head of Google Fiber’s Texas division, said Google Fiber will have the capability to extend into residential neighborhoods.

“San Antonio is a very interesting city and a really attractive city to see what’s possible with gigabit speeds,” Strama said.

He said San Antonio has more data centers, more hosting capability, more cloud-based, cloud-driven businesses than almost anywhere in the country.

A Google Fiber van parked in front of the San Antonio skyline.  Courtesy of the Google Fiber Facebook page.

A Google Fiber van parked in front of the San Antonio skyline. Courtesy of the Google Fiber Facebook page.

“What’s really interesting is that while there are these big industries and businesses that have flourished based on high bandwidth and connectivity, what we really are excited about doing is extending that kind of connectivity all the way to people’s homes and making it accessible to the small businesses and entrepreneurs in this economy,” he said.

Mark Strama, head of Google Fiber Texas, speaks to attendees about the announcement. Photo by Joan Vinson.

Mark Strama, head of Google Fiber Texas, speaks to attendees about the announcement. Photo by Joan Vinson.

Lorenzo Gomez, director of Geekdom and the 80/20 Foundation, two tech-driven organizations that will help introduce Google to San Antonio’s tech community, said Google Fiber does not have a definitive time span for implementation.

“They could start within a year, it could take them a couple of years, it really is up to how good their project management team is going to be,” he said.

Contractors hired by Google have already filed permits to begin installing the network in a small section of a neighborhood on the northwest side between loops 1604 and 410. The plans don’t say if the Great Northwest neighborhood will indeed be ground zero for Fiber. 

“Google Fiber recognizes that San Antonio is poised to embrace the digital revolution and lead in the 21st century economy. I look forward to working with Google and other industry providers to create access for every San Antonian,” Councilmember Ron Nirenberg (D8) stated in a news release. “Partnerships between the private and public sectors will ensure that San Antonio is a city of opportunity and prosperity by building infrastructure, improving service, expanding access and reducing cost.”

 

*Featured/top image: Left to Right, Mark Strama, Mayor Ivy Taylor, and Lorenzo Gomez pose for a photo after the announcement of Google Fiber coming to San Antonio.  Photo by Joan Vinson.  

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Lighting Up Dark Fiber: San Antonio’s Broadband Plan

12 thoughts on “It’s Official: Google Fiber is Coming to San Antonio

  1. “Coming” to Satx…. just like it’s been “coming” to Austin. Everyone I know who signed up for #fiber has been waiting for almost a year without any signs of it actually happening. Also, to play devils advocate, by using Google Fiber you are agreeing to let them use your data however they see fit…

  2. Anyone else notice that the view of downtown they are using for the official announcement has been flipped east west, even though the van looks correct? Not complaining, but the view is looking south, but in the full image, the tower and Hyatt are on the right. Interesting story I bet on why the image was flipped for the promotion. Or, maybe this announcement is for a parallel dimension version of San Antonio.

  3. This is good news for our city. Hopefully, then we will truly see high speed internet. This is great news for telemedicine and multiple industries across SA. Thanks, Google!

  4. Since San Antonio already has an established fiber ring that we’re not using, installed by CPS years ago. And because state law forbids municipalities from providing telecommunications to the public. Why doesn’t the city sell this fiber ring to Google in order to speed up the process of implementation.

  5. Since San Antonio already has an established fiber ring that we’re not using, installed by CPS years ago. And because state law forbids municipalities from providing telecommunications to the public. Why doesn’t the city sell this fiber ring to Google in order to speed up the process of implementation.

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