The Art of Listening: Why Young People’s Ambivalence about San Antonio Should Matter to You

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Broadway on its best day: Síclovía

Callie Enlow, a young journalist who arrived in San Antonio a few years ago and has a knack for writing things people read and respond to intensely, raised a ruckus with her most recent contribution, “Left Behind: Why People Leave San Antonio.” If you haven’t read it, take a few minutes to do so and then come on back.

Interest in the article, posted Monday evening, built steadily, and on Wednesday it set a new one-day  traffic record for the The Rivard Report, now two months old. Readership peaked Wednesday, but stayed strong through Friday afternoon. The story was the most talked about posting all week on the local version of reddit.com. Callie could attend her own wedding Saturday to Ben Judson, who blogs for Plaza de Armas, knowing she is making a real difference in her adopted city.

New arrivals to TRR will enjoy Enlow’s earlier, related piece, “South of Southtown: Life on the Other Side of the Tracks.” We won’t link to every article in the sequence, but it all began with my first posting on Feb. 13, 2012, the day we launched the site. “Urban Renaissance for San Antonio? Keeping Score in a Fast-Changing City” was an upbeat survey of the changing face of San Antonio’s urban core. It provoked a former Lake/Flato architect now living in Hamburg, Germany, to fire off a TransAtlantic challenge: “San Antonio? Not Anytime Soon.” The debate was on. More voices entered the conversation and can be found below. Anyone else care to weigh in?

 

Full house at Bliss in Southtown. (Photo by Robert Rivard)

Enlow’s latest piece hit a nerve with others her age. Even as many young newcomers to San Antonio listed the various reasons they live and work here or feel so attached to San Antonio, they agreed with her observations in overwhelming numbers when it comes to what the city lacks in the way of must-have urban amenities, such as better public transportation. As a member of the Baby Boomer generation, I agree with their constructive criticisms of the city, and I also understand that they can’t see what someone who has been here for years can: namely, how much San Antonio has changed for the better.

Some readers from my generation or, perhaps, even older, responded less agreeably. Go to The Rivard Report page on Facebook to see what I mean. One individual in particular, Roger Glenn Stephens,  posted so many responses I stopped counting them. I did read them all, Roger. What surprised me in reading, or trying to keep up, with Stephens’ postings is that they were written by a highly educated lawyer who lives in Southtown and is passionate about a multitude of progressive issues and projects downtown. He is a regular contributor of photos and observations on the Seen in Southtown page. Now that particular page skews toward a different demographic than the one Enlow represents. Membership includes older, longtime Southtown residents who sometimes express ambivalence about the neighborhood’s changing face. Not many Millennials here.

One thing’s worth remembering for those “who got here first” and now feel put out by the criticisms of younger people. The people who fought in World War II and then started the suburban movement were as confused by their  children in the 60s, who rejected their conservative values and stunted cultural mores that seemed so repressive and, well, 1950s. Now those same children of the 60s are today’s aging parents and some, it seems to me, are as tone-deaf to the message of change as were their parents. How ironic.

When I read Enlow — and I think both she and her fiancé are talented communicators who merit close reading — I feel like I am a fly on the wall at Luke, or the Esquire or The Friendly Spot, and am privvy to what young professionals half my age, members of the “creative class,” are saying to each other over a beer or burger. I am pleased we are being invited into that conversation. Even where I might not agree with everything said, I want to know what motivated them to say it and believe it.

Put another way, it’s imperative that our city’s civic, business and cultural leaders listen carefully to Enlow’s generation and respond to their needs, or accept the reality that we will continue to lose them to other cities. Rackspace Chairman and SA2020 Tri-Chair Graham Weston has a question he likes to ask when speaking before leaderships groups, especially when an audience member challenges the value of downtown investment or Weston’s well-known desire to quicken the pace of change in San Antonio.

“I ask people, ‘How many of you have children who attended college and then decided to not come back to San Antonio?’ and without exemption all hands go up except for one or two people, here or there, where a family business has led to children returning,” Weston said. “I want a city where our kids don’t all leave en masse and where it is easier to convince talented young people to move here and stay here.”

We are on our way, in my opinion, but I understand that some very smart people argue just as convincingly that we are changing too slowly, not moving fast enough.  How do you see the state of living and working in San Antonio compared to other metropolitan areas? Does our city make your list of Top 10 Downtowns?

Mayor Julián Castro and others tout San Antonio as the seventh largest city, but that’s a number games to me. I accept our status as a top 25 metro area and don’t pretend we’ve really passed Boston or about to overtake Philadelphia. The regional cities I most enjoy don’t seem to spend any energy pretending to be bigger than they really are. They focus instead on why they are better than somewhere else rather than bigger than somewhere else. Being big is not analogous to being good. Rate of growth and inventory of urban amenities are better measures.

Broadway on its best day: Síclovía

 

I did sit down and make lists of my favorite cities, big, regional and small.  I have no desire to go elsewhere. I’d rather be part of transforming our city. But that doesn’t mean I rate the home team as number one. My own choices are based on where I have been, and I haven’t been everywhere. This will probably start a bar argument or provoke some snarky commentary, but I bet the people agreeing with Enlow would probably agree with me that my lists are a good road map used by all those young, creative types who are not coming here, or worse, are on their way out.

Top 10 Regional Downtowns                      Top 10 Big City Downtowns

1. Austin                                                                                                                       1. New York

2. Seattle                                                                                                                       2. Los Angeles

3. Portland                                                                                                                   3. Chicago

4. Denver                                                                                                                      4. Boston

5. San Diego                                                                                                                5. San Francisco

6. San Antonio                                                                                                           6. Miami

7. New Orleans                                                                                                           7. Washington DC

8. Indianapolis                                                                                                           8. Philadelphia

9.  Milwaukee                                                                                                              9. Atlanta

10. Louisville                                                                                                              10. Dallas

Top 10 Small Cities

1. Boulder, CO

2. Madison, WI

3. Santa Fe, NM

4. Bend, ORE

5. Fort Collins, CO

6. Asheville, NC

7. Charlottesville, VI

8. Traverse City, MI

9. Portsmouth, NH

10. Bozeman, MON

I reserve the right to change my mind.

 

 

 

15 thoughts on “The Art of Listening: Why Young People’s Ambivalence about San Antonio Should Matter to You

  1. It is a fascinating topic because this is an issue I have chewed over for the past 25 years.  I moved here as a senior in high school under duress.  I stayed for college and happily met my wife.  We were done with San Antonio and made the move to graduate schools in other Texas cities.  I would add Houston to the list of great cities, BTW.  There, we were able to choose between many outstanding ethnic restaurants.  We could go to a world premiere opera at the HGO.  We could listen to live blues any night of the week, take swing lessons (it was the mid 90’s after all), go to a rave-ish after-hours dance club, then have breakfast at a dingy all night diner.   However, I never felt as if my not being there would have made a difference to anyone.  Complete anonymity.  I had also lived in Rio de Janeiro for 5 years and the D.C. area of 8 years growing up, and spent a semester in London in college.  All great cities, but not places that I can imagine leaving a dent in.
     
    When deciding where to move next, we had a choice between San Antonio, Houston, Dallas, and Los Angeles (for residency).  We chose San Antonio because we were ready to start a family and there seemed to be some exciting things happening.  We bounced around the outer edges feeling some malaise about our decision until we found Southtown and specifically sent our kids to Bonham Academy (the school right behind Rosario’s).  There, we have found a group of people with vision, curiosity, intelligence and creative energy.  Bigger cities certainly have culture and amenities but also anonymity. In those places, it is perhaps funner to live as an observer but more difficult to gain the access to become a participant in the creative process.  San Antonio has a great feeling of place, scale, and “terroir” of which I look forward to continuing to take part.

  2. I was born in San Antonio to a family that settled here because of their military affiliation.  Of all the places in the world they lived, my Grandparents saw something special in San Antonio.  My age is such that I straddle the fence between the Baby Boomers and Generation X.  As a military brat with gypsy blood, I have lived in 17 different cities in 7 states.  Always, I come ‘home’ to San Antonio.  No matter where my crazy life takes me, the Alamo City has always been home base.
     
    After hurricanes Katrina and Rita tried to blow us off the map in Baton Rouge, I moved back with my three kids.  I made it into college at SAC a semester before my daughter became the third generation to graduate from Holmes High School. My son joined the Army and went off to Afghanistan to fight a war that few outside our military-minded community even think about on a daily basis.  My daughter followed me to college and my young son attended school in the SAISD.  I struggled financially while in college at SAC then A&M-SA, was homeless twice, and did without electricity for months at a time.  But we always managed to fit into the community, because the ‘hunger factor’ is more universal than the upper class of SA would like to admit.
     
    Like my younger classmates, I found myself determined to get an education and overcome the poverty of my circumstances.  There is a certain amount of barrio pride among us, who inherited this town by simply being born here.  We are blessed with a few community leaders who managed to scrape out a successful living, and we try to learn by their example.  But by and large, the ‘successful’ in San Antonio are transplants who saw opportunity in the poverty, and said, “Well I’m sure I can do at least that well”.  Another generous portion of the successful in SA are retired, made money somewhere else and came to maximize their nest egg. 
     
    I think it is that very separation of the classes that makes people want to leave San Antonio. The perceived inability to jump class, or to get ahead turns every Fiesta into another reason to drink to inebriation.  The constant daily struggle beats down on the underclass, which stokes the underlying resentment.  Like the Helotes brush fire, you can’t see it from the outside, but underneath it all, there’s trouble brewing.  I hear it in anger from natives that all of the city’s resources are used for the tourist industry, and outsiders who say that they don’t feel safe. 
     
    At my college graduation, Anita Perry was the guest speaker.  When she said, “All y’all graduates who don’t have a job yet, don’t worry.  The state of Texas is doing better than any other in the nation.  The opportunities are here for you.”  I seriously looked under my seat to see if there was something taped to the chair that said I would have a job.  Then I thought, she’s not from here, she doesn’t have a clue, and she sure hasn’t seen the inside of my empty refrigerator.  I spent my college years doing volunteer work in the community related to my field of study.  But as a communications major, my opportunities in San Antonio were not only limited, but in direct competition with hundreds of people who had been laid off from lifetime careers in newspaper, television and advertising.  I switched majors at the university level to diversify myself and gain a better understanding of society with a degree in Human Relations.  The best opportunity I was able to find was as a social worker in the welfare office.
     
    My young sister who was raised in the Phoenix area found a job at AT&T and was among the lucky who were transferred to Dallas.  She says that she never had a thought of staying in San Antonio, which to her is a dirty little neglected town that didn’t feel safe.  Now she lives in a city with a higher crime rate, but no visible gangsters and a city that is light years ahead in areas of downtown development, family atmosphere and hope for the futures of her children.  Her husband is a San Antonio native who is now happy to be a stay-at-home dad in Dallas, where the future feels brighter, and the opportunities more abundant. 
     
    I have been an advocate in San Antonio for alternative transportation.  I gave away my car, bought bicycles for myself and my children, and became a voice in the community to promote bicycle commuting.  I rented a place near downtown that allowed me easy access to school and my internship at the newspaper.  I structured my life to make the things I care about the most the center of my existence.  But when I was run over by a city employee, and even though the employee admitted fault, the city’s representatives refused to replace my transportation and left me to fend for myself from the seat of a wheelchair.  I became a homeless crippled graduate, bouncing from family member to family member, recovering from my accident while camping on the floor of my daughter’s apartment, my sister’s trailer and my niece’s foreclosed home.  My youngest son switched schools FIVE times.  Now I have had to file a lawsuit against my very own city that I have invested so much of my life in service to. I’ve also had to leave San Antonio.  Now in Dallas, a place I am learning to love, I’m nearly recovered and back to seeking that ever-elusive American dream that was promised to me in return for investing in my education. 
     
    San Antonio suffers from what I I realize, this reply is filled with “I”s.  But it’s not all about me.  It’s about the hundreds of others that are just like me.  It’s about my children who will, for all their hardships, grow up to be educated, contributing, concerned citizens of some other place.  San Antonio suffers from what I call “Pinata Mentality”  which encourages citizens to beat the hell out of the prize with a big stick until the goodies are set free, then grab all that you can get for yourself.
    

  3. I was born in San Antonio to a family that settled here because of their military affiliation.  Of all the places in the world they lived, my Grandparents saw something special in San Antonio.  My age is such that I straddle the fence between the Baby Boomers and Generation X.  As a military brat with gypsy blood, I have lived in 17 different cities in 7 states.  Always, I come ‘home’ to San Antonio.  No matter where my crazy life takes me, the Alamo City has always been home base.
     
    After hurricanes Katrina and Rita tried to blow us off the map in Baton Rouge, I moved back with my three kids.  I made it into college at SAC a semester before my daughter became the third generation to graduate from Holmes High School. My son joined the Army and went off to Afghanistan to fight a war that few outside our military-minded community even think about on a daily basis.  My daughter followed me to college and my young son attended school in the SAISD.  I struggled financially while in college at SAC then A&M-SA, was homeless twice, and did without electricity for months at a time.  But we always managed to fit into the community, because the ‘hunger factor’ is more universal than the upper class of SA would like to admit.
     
    Like my younger classmates, I found myself determined to get an education and overcome the poverty of my circumstances.  There is a certain amount of barrio pride among us, who inherited this town by simply being born here.  We are blessed with a few community leaders who managed to scrape out a successful living, and we try to learn by their example.  But by and large, the ‘successful’ in San Antonio are transplants who saw opportunity in the poverty, and said, “Well I’m sure I can do at least that well”.  Another generous portion of the successful in SA are retired, made money somewhere else and came to maximize their nest egg. 
     
    I think it is that very separation of the classes that makes people want to leave San Antonio. The perceived inability to jump class, or to get ahead turns every Fiesta into another reason to drink to inebriation.  The constant daily struggle beats down on the underclass, which stokes the underlying resentment.  Like the Helotes brush fire, you can’t see it from the outside, but underneath it all, there’s trouble brewing.  I hear it in anger from natives that all of the city’s resources are used for the tourist industry, and outsiders who say that they don’t feel safe. 
     
    At my college graduation, Anita Perry was the guest speaker.  When she said, “All y’all graduates who don’t have a job yet, don’t worry.  The state of Texas is doing better than any other in the nation.  The opportunities are here for you.”  I seriously looked under my seat to see if there was something taped to the chair that said I would have a job.  Then I thought, she’s not from here, she doesn’t have a clue, and she sure hasn’t seen the inside of my empty refrigerator.  I spent my college years doing volunteer work in the community related to my field of study.  But as a communications major, my opportunities in San Antonio were not only limited, but in direct competition with hundreds of people who had been laid off from lifetime careers in newspaper, television and advertising.  I switched majors at the university level to diversify myself and gain a better understanding of society with a degree in Human Relations.  The best opportunity I was able to find was as a social worker in the welfare office.
     
    My young sister who was raised in the Phoenix area found a job at AT&T and was among the lucky who were transferred to Dallas.  She says that she never had a thought of staying in San Antonio, which to her is a dirty little neglected town that didn’t feel safe.  Now she lives in a city with a higher crime rate, but no visible gangsters and a city that is light years ahead in areas of downtown development, family atmosphere and hope for the futures of her children.  Her husband is a San Antonio native who is now happy to be a stay-at-home dad in Dallas, where the future feels brighter, and the opportunities more abundant. 
     
    I have been an advocate in San Antonio for alternative transportation.  I gave away my car, bought bicycles for myself and my children, and became a voice in the community to promote bicycle commuting.  I rented a place near downtown that allowed me easy access to school and my internship at the newspaper.  I structured my life to make the things I care about the most the center of my existence.  But when I was run over by a city employee, and even though the employee admitted fault, the city’s representatives refused to replace my transportation and left me to fend for myself from the seat of a wheelchair.  I became a homeless crippled graduate, bouncing from family member to family member, recovering from my accident while camping on the floor of my daughter’s apartment, my sister’s trailer and my niece’s foreclosed home.  My youngest son switched schools FIVE times.  Now I have had to file a lawsuit against my very own city that I have invested so much of my life in service to. I’ve also had to leave San Antonio.  Now in Dallas, a place I am learning to love, I’m nearly recovered and back to seeking that ever-elusive American dream that was promised to me in return for investing in my education. 
     
    San Antonio suffers from what I call “Pinata Mentality”, which encourages citizens to beat the hell out of the prize with a big stick and then grab everything you possible can get.  Because you never know if this is going to be your last chance to feast on the goodies, or how long it will be til the next time.  I realize, this reply is filled with “I”s.  But it’s not all about me.  It’s about the hundreds of others that are just like me.  It’s about my children, college graduates, a returning war veteran and talented artists and musicians, who, for all their hardships, will grow up to be educated, contributing, concerned citizens of some other place. 
    

  4. I was born in San Antonio to a family that settled here because of their military affiliation.  Of all the places in the world they lived, my Grandparents saw something special in San Antonio.  My age is such that I straddle the fence between the Baby Boomers and Generation X.  As a military brat with gypsy blood, I have lived in 17 different cities in 7 states.  Always, I come ‘home’ to San Antonio.  No matter where my crazy life takes me, the Alamo City has always been home base.
     
    After hurricanes Katrina and Rita tried to blow us off the map in Baton Rouge, I moved back with my three kids.  I made it into college at SAC a semester before my daughter became the third generation to graduate from Holmes High School. My son joined the Army and went off to Afghanistan to fight a war that few outside our military-minded community even think about on a daily basis.  My daughter followed me to college and my young son attended school in the SAISD.  I struggled financially while in college at SAC then A&M-SA, was homeless twice, and did without electricity for months at a time.  But we always managed to fit into the community, because the ‘hunger factor’ is more universal than the upper class of SA would like to admit.
     
    Like my younger classmates, I found myself determined to get an education and overcome the poverty of my circumstances.  There is a certain amount of barrio pride among us, who inherited this town by simply being born here.  We are blessed with a few community leaders who managed to scrape out a successful living, and we try to learn by their example.  But by and large, the ‘successful’ in San Antonio are transplants who saw opportunity in the poverty, and said, “Well I’m sure I can do at least that well”.  Another generous portion of the successful in SA are retired, made money somewhere else and came to maximize their nest egg. 
     
    I think it is that very separation of the classes that makes people want to leave San Antonio. The perceived inability to jump class, or to get ahead turns every Fiesta into another reason to drink to inebriation.  The constant daily struggle beats down on the underclass, which stokes the underlying resentment.  Like the Helotes brush fire, you can’t see it from the outside, but underneath it all, there’s trouble brewing.  I hear it in anger from natives that all of the city’s resources are used for the tourist industry, and outsiders who say that they don’t feel safe. 
     
    At my college graduation, Anita Perry was the guest speaker.  When she said, “All y’all graduates who don’t have a job yet, don’t worry.  The state of Texas is doing better than any other in the nation.  The opportunities are here for you.”  I seriously looked under my seat to see if there was something taped to the chair that said I would have a job.  Then I thought, she’s not from here, she doesn’t have a clue, and she sure hasn’t seen the inside of my empty refrigerator.  I spent my college years doing volunteer work in the community related to my field of study.  But as a communications major, my opportunities in San Antonio were not only limited, but in direct competition with hundreds of people who had been laid off from lifetime careers in newspaper, television and advertising.  I switched majors at the university level to diversify myself and gain a better understanding of society with a degree in Human Relations.  The best opportunity I was able to find was as a social worker in the welfare office.
     
    My young sister who was raised in the Phoenix area found a job at AT&T and was among the lucky who were transferred to Dallas.  She says that she never had a thought of staying in San Antonio, which to her is a dirty little neglected town that didn’t feel safe.  Now she lives in a city with a higher crime rate, but no visible gangsters and a city that is light years ahead in areas of downtown development, family atmosphere and hope for the futures of her children.  Her husband is a San Antonio native who is now happy to be a stay-at-home dad in Dallas, where the future feels brighter, and the opportunities more abundant. 
     
    I have been an advocate in San Antonio for alternative transportation.  I gave away my car, bought bicycles for myself and my children, and became a voice in the community to promote bicycle commuting.  I rented a place near downtown that allowed me easy access to school and my internship at the newspaper.  I structured my life to make the things I care about the most the center of my existence.  But when I was run over by a city employee, and even though the employee admitted fault, the city’s representatives refused to replace my transportation and left me to fend for myself from the seat of a wheelchair.  I became a homeless crippled graduate, bouncing from family member to family member, recovering from my accident while camping on the floor of my daughter’s apartment, my sister’s trailer and my niece’s foreclosed home.  My youngest son switched schools FIVE times.  Now I have had to file a lawsuit against my very own city that I have invested so much of my life in service to. I’ve also had to leave San Antonio.  Now in Dallas, a place I am learning to love, I’m nearly recovered and back to seeking that ever-elusive American dream that was promised to me in return for investing in my education. 
     
    San Antonio suffers from what I call “Pinata Mentality”, which encourages citizens to beat the hell out of the prize with a big stick and then grab everything you possible can get.  Because you never know if this is going to be your last chance to feast on the goodies, or how long it will be til the next time.  I realize, this reply is filled with “I”s.  But it’s not all about me.  It’s about the hundreds of others that are just like me.  It’s about my children, college graduates, a returning war veteran and talented artists and musicians, who, for all their hardships, will grow up to be educated, contributing, concerned citizens of some other place. 
    

  5. The saddest thing about the “truth” in this article is that our business are operating this way. No innovation in marketing. The city of San Antonio had to outsource its marketing to Austin because we could not meet the need internally. That is a disgrace. @gweston Thank you for sharing. Let’s be change agents for the city.

  6. add Chattanooga to the small city downtown list.  It is really easy to get to and move around in.  Has a lively art and music scene and lots of great affrodable places for people of all ages to live.  Fabulous walking around.

  7. I am a baby boomer who reluctantly came back to SA about 30 years ago. I have grown to love the City, even more than my previous beloved Austin. I admit to bristling while reading Enlow’s article, but also tried to understand it. I appreciate all the comments, for and against, and for your posting some follow up thoughts and insights. It’s always interesting to get different points of view from intelligent folks. Something you don’t see that often in the current political climate.

  8. I think your lists are spot on. I would only trade San Francisco and Los Angeles on the big city list. 
     
    On the Regional Downtowns list, I was looking for commonalities and contributing factors. One thing I find interesting is that Austin occupies the #1 spot, yet public transportation—often cited as SA’s limiting factor—is certainly not a solved problem. They are further ahead than San Antonio, but I know very few people living there without a car. That gives me hope that we can see improvement in urban density that will drive public transportation investments (rather than waiting for the voter apathy to suddenly change direction). 
     
    The top contributing factor to a great city: strong districts. Districts form concentrations of like-minded individuals, create walkable neighborhoods, and promote a strong sense of community and belonging. San Francisco does this really well. They’ve enjoyed an absolute explosion of their tech and startup scene, and I think the fact that the companies are so concentrated in one location really helps. 
     
    Austin’s downtown was formed by the presence of UT. A large concentration of college students helped establish a nexus that’s gone on to create several more districts for entertainment and business. It’s tragic that UTSA doesn’t have its main campus similarly located downtown. A colligate presence would do a lot for the local nightlife and be extremely complimentary to the tourism industry that already exists.
     
    I think River North is one of the best linear parks in the nation. It’s a great example of the art, architecture, and spirit that’s uniquely San Antonio. If you haven’t been down there  yet, you owe it to yourself to go. That project made me remember something very important: the riverwalk was originally built for locals. Think about that for a moment. It’s critical that we’ve started to reclaim major portions of it as city parks. Together with Pearl, River North has seeded what I think is our best chance of a second live/walk district (Southtown being the first). If we can continue with those projects as a blueprint for new development, I think our city will see a dramatic transformation. Not in who we are, but how articulately and passionately we can express and live it.
     

  9. I think your lists are spot on. I would only trade San Francisco and Los Angeles on the big city list. 
     
    On the Regional Downtowns list, I was looking for commonalities and contributing factors. One thing I find interesting is that Austin occupies the #1 spot, yet public transportation—often cited as SA’s limiting factor—is certainly not a solved problem. They are further ahead than San Antonio, but I know very few people living there without a car. That gives me hope that we can see improvement in urban density that will drive public transportation investments (rather than waiting for the voter apathy to suddenly change direction). 
     
    The top contributing factor to a great city: strong districts. Districts form concentrations of like-minded individuals, create walkable neighborhoods, and promote a strong sense of community and belonging. San Francisco does this really well. They’ve enjoyed an absolute explosion of their tech and startup scene, and I think the fact that the companies are so concentrated in one location really helps. 
     
    Austin’s downtown was formed by the presence of UT. A large concentration of college students helped establish a nexus that’s gone on to create several more districts for entertainment and business. It’s tragic that UTSA doesn’t have its main campus similarly located downtown. A collegiate presence would do a lot for the local nightlife and be extremely complimentary to the tourism industry that already exists.
     
    I think River North is one of the best linear parks in the nation. It’s a great example of the art, architecture, and spirit that’s uniquely San Antonio. If you haven’t been down there  yet, you owe it to yourself to go. That project made me remember something very important: the riverwalk was originally built for locals. Think about that for a moment. It’s critical that we’ve started to reclaim major portions of it as city parks. Together with Pearl, River North has seeded what I think is our best chance of a second live/walk district (Southtown being the first). If we can continue with those projects as a blueprint for new development, I think our city will see a dramatic transformation. Not in who we are, but how articulately and passionately we can express and live it.
     

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  11. Okay. Light rail Austin so you can pump money into Austin. Money needs to be spent locally.
    Empty venues and bands can’t make it because if you don’t ddupport them, venues can’t afford to pay bands. Go to New York and ooffice an apartment, oubkic transportation, schooling, and restarunts. If you made
    $30, 000 in San Antonio, you’d need about $45,000 in New
    York and when all said and done, savings would be about the same.
    Get it? Higher cost to have same mean more expense even though you make more. Think about it, if we were high tech in S.A. , business owners would see your salaries and up their prices. $3.00 for today’s Bert would be $4.00 $4.50. Damn! $9.00 for 2 beers. $700.00 monthly apartment rent would jump to $1000.00—$8400.00 vs $12,000.00. $10.00 at Dominoes here would be about $15.00. A few dollars here and there you say, but at the end of the year that $10,000.00 more pay in the Big Apple is eaten up.

    $30.00 monthly bus pass would be $50.00. New York. New York, Start spreading the news….

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