24 thoughts on “Vision Zero: Making San Antonio’s Streets Safe

    • Sidewalks are important, but if the goal is preventing all traffic fatalities and injuries, focusing on sidewalks alone won’t do it. Several reasons:

      1. Pedestrians are killed and seriously injured at a higher rate than motorists, but those incidents most often happen crossing the street, not walking along a street without sidewalks. Pedestrians are also struck while walking on sidewalks.
      2. Sidewalks will not prevent motorist fatalities and serious injuries.
      3. Sidewalks will not prevent fatalities and serious injuries to people riding bikes.

      The solution will be bigger than sidewalks alone, but whatever that solution is, the next question to ask is why hasn’t it already been done? There are two reasons: money and popularity. Transportation funding is spent overwhelmingly on moving as many cars as fast as possible. New roads, wider lanes and more lanes. Roads are expensive, and they are being built without sufficient money to maintain them. Spending money on sidewalks means there is less money to build more and wider roads.

      The money used to build more and wider roads could instead be used to build sidewalks or make existing roads safer, but it’s not because what is popular is more and wider roads, not safer roads.

      Sidewalks on every street would be great, but not as great as every street being safe for every user. Coincidentally, you’ll find the money for sidewalks when safety takes precedent over mobility (speed).

  1. Hope this goes beyond District 5. The kids in our neighborhood do not have bus service, yet they are unable to walk on sidewalks all the way to school. There are blind spots along the way, and sadly, it’s going to take someone getting hurt or killed before San Antonio does something about it.

  2. Hipsters need to start promoting wearing helmets and media needs to respect the initiative by using photography that promotes an all inclusive safety protocol. Thanks for discussing Rivard Report now go the distance! Butt on bike helmet on head! God bless our commuters!

  3. Hipsters need to start promoting wearing helmets and media needs to respect the initiative by using photography that promotes an all inclusive safety protocol. Thanks for discussing Rivard Report now go the distance! Butt on bike helmet on head! God bless our commuters!

  4. One of the first things that needs to be done is something about the readability of street signs at night. It’s either the street light wavelength, sign paint, combination, or something else (not my eyes), that makes the intersection signs hanging in the streets totally unreadable. Drivers focus so much attention on figuring out the street that they lose focus on driving. I travel all over the country weekly, and no other city has this problem.

    • Sorry, I mean I don’t have this problem in any other city. It’s very strange and has happened when clear, raining, etc. I go to San Antonio often, so maybe I’m not “used” to it, but there is definitely something wrong when comparing it to driving around at night in other cities around the country. Street signs (I’m talking about the big ones dangling over the intersection) that are typically on major streets people are looking for should not be hard to find – since they typically occur at intersections of busy streets where there is a lot of traffic where drivers need to have as much focus on the road conditions as possible (such as other cars, bikes, and pedestrians). Just a comment from a frequent visitor every year since 1960s.

      • I don’t mean hard to find. They are very clearing dangling over the intersection. But they look blank. You can’t see the letters at night at a lot of intersections. There, done.

  5. People who bike will start respecting the rules of the road once people who drive start respecting the rules of the road & being courteous to everyone on the street. Enforcement needs to go BOTH ways.

  6. I’m all for motorist safety. Motorists should wear helmets and obey all traffic laws when driving! Too many senseless deaths while driving, let’s protect our motorists, all passengers wear helmets and follow traffic laws, come on we can do it!!

  7. What a stupid statement. Traffic deaths are, and always will be, inevitable. Politicians that talk like this should be sent packing because chasing unrealistic goals is not the role of government.

    Do what you can to maximize safety and minimize restrictions on individual freedom. That’s it.

  8. Um. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that it is estimated that 40% of San Antonio drivers don’t possess driver’s licenses? And 60% don’t have insurance? Helloooo??

  9. I wish the city would maintain the bike lanes, making them safer for cyclists to ride. Many of the bike lanes are littered with broken glass, sharp metal fragments, and other hazardous debris, that make it difficult for cyclist to use. Bike tires and tubes are not cheap! Recently, a group of cyclists from all over the city participated in a Bike Lane Clean-up Party, cleaning bike lanes along Broadway, Austin St., the bike lanes around Maverick Park, and numerous other areas. The city should be cleaning the bike lanes on a regular basis and not be dependent on it’s citizens to do the city’s job.

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