Finding Medina: Bonus Episode: The Original Texas Declaration of Independence

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Descendent and actor Joe Arciniega records his reading of the original Texas Declaration of Independence.

Courtesy / Brandon Seale

Actor Joe Arciniega records his reading of the original Texas Declaration of Independence.

For the first time that I know of, we present here to the public the original Texas Declaration of Independence in English – as performed by Joe Arciniega, a direct descendant of the men who were declaring that independence back in 1813.

1813 Texas Declaration of Independence (Transcribed in Spanish by Brian Stauffer)

1813 Texas Declaration of Independence (Translated by Brandon Seale)

11 thoughts on “Finding Medina: Bonus Episode: The Original Texas Declaration of Independence

  1. Thank you for continuing to promote this most important, yet lesser known, period of Texas history. We cannot fully understand the Texas revolution of 1835-1836 unless we understand the first Texas revolution of 1812-1813….the buildup, the revolt, the success, the battles, the losses, and the aftermath. People today, (especially the descendants of the Tejanos and Native Americans who built the Tejas that people died for) must have access to information about 1812-1813 in the same way they have access to information about 1835-1836. Every exposure helps!

  2. When the words are written, the words are spoken and the words are heard, then the words are understood and remembered. These words ring loud and clear of a message for freedom with no limitations or hesitation that the time is now. Thank you for presenting these words to help clarify the aims and goals of people and nation. Very inspiring.

    • Thank you, Fred, for your words and for your many contributions over the years to San Antonio history and cultural memory!

  3. April 6, 1813 is important for Texas as is July 4th for the American Colonies:

    I listened to this podcast twice to get it all and understood that what was written in 1813 stands true today, as

    1. man craves for freedom and independence;

    2. the well being and happiness of communities; and

    3. government is “NOT for the enrichment of a few individuals.”

    I could go on and on as each paragraph holds truth. Please give my thanks and appreciation to your friend for locating the original in the Mexican archives.

    • Hi Maximo, if you scroll up to the link that says “1813 Texas Declaration of Independence (Translated by Brandon Seale)” you should be able to access it. I’ll also email it to you. Thanks!

  4. Keep up te good work Brandon! It is important for the new generations to have te complete picture, and not only a one-side of it. Great podcast!

    • Gracias, amigo! I hope you heard the shout-out I gave to you back in Episode 6. Thanks for your help digging up the old Stephen F. Austin maps from SEDENA en CDMX. This has been a community effort to uncover old information!

  5. Thank you Brandon Seale for bringing this critical piece of history to light. We should be proud Tejanos as we listen or read with eloquence this call for freedom from the yoke of tyranny. The spark that lit the fuse to eventual freedom, and most certainly to positives impact our young history students.
    It is imperative that young students be educated of this important Tejano treasure.

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