City Clerk Leticia Vacek is retiring. Credit: Bonnie Arbittier / Rivard Report

Leticia Vacek – who has served as San Antonio’s city clerk during the tenure of five mayors, nine City Councils, and 101 City Council members over the last 16 years – announced her retirement on Friday. Her last day is March 6.

“Leticia Vacek has been an outstanding leader as the City Clerk,” Mayor Ron Nirenberg said in a news release. “She is an innovator who has seamlessly kept the Office of the City Clerk up to date in rapidly changing times. I wish her the best.”

The city clerk is responsible for a wide range of duties within the City organization, including filing municipal records, drafting agendas, certifying petitions, and more. The Office of the City Clerk has 32 employees and a $9.2 million operating and revenue budget during election years. It also includes the City’s Vital Records Division, Passport Division, Archives Division, Records Management Division, and Legislative Division.

“I am blessed to be able to retire from the seventh largest city in our nation and will always be grateful for the support from all mayors and council I have served,” Vacek stated in the release.

City Council will launch a national search for the next City Clerk.

During her tenure, she established the City’s Passport Acceptance Facility, which has generated more than $5 million in revenue and will continue to generate $1 million annually in processing and notary fees.

Vacek also championed transparency as she implemented the first searchable campaign finance reporting system for candidates and officeholders.  

Before she was appointed in 2004 by then Mayor Ed Garza and City Council, she was director of administration for the City of McAllen. She holds an associate degree from South Texas College, a bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of the Incarnate Word, and various certifications and designations from municipal clerk organizations.

Since joining the City of San Antonio, she has attended 1,095 City Council Meetings and signed more than 17,000 official sets of minutes, ordinances and resolutions, according to City records. 

Iris Dimmick

Senior reporter Iris Dimmick covers City Hall, politics, development, and more. Contact her at iris@rivardreport.com

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